Travis CI

4.1 (125)
Platform for testing and deploying codes

Overall rating

4.1 /5
(125)
Value for Money
3.9/5
Features
4.1/5
Ease of Use
3.9/5
Customer Support
3.3/5

75%
recommended this app
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125 Reviews

Elliott
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: 11-50 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 10.0 /10

Really simple to use continuous integration.

Reviewed on 18/07/2019

Pros

We use it to run php unit tests whenever we commit code to a repository. All we have to do is include a file in the root of the project and enable the project in the travis interface. Takes less than 5 minutes to set up fully automated unit testing. Much more easy than setting up your own CI pipeline with the huge amount of different apps that exists. Generous free tier.

Cons

Can be slow at times, documentation can on occasion be more minimal than I would like. As a developer you get used to this though, there are always loads of examples online.

Alternatives Considered

GitLab

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

Travis works on all major providers.
Tamseel
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: 11-50 Employees
  • Used Weekly for 6-12 months
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 9.0 /10

Travis CI is great automation tool is easy to configure and run.

Reviewed on 12/10/2019

We have used Travis ci for automation of code building, testing and deployment. Travis CI is one of the top continuous integration and continuous delivery tool available in the market. We usually use Travis CI for medium scale projects because it easy to use, few minutes of configure is needed comparative to Jenkins which require skilled professional to configure it. We have used it for test projects as it is free for public projects.
Travis Ci is good for small to medium scale projects, which doesn’t require much of the customization or less complex projects. Travis CI is also good for public and open source projects because it provides free tier for public projects. It’s easy to use, you don’t need any professional skill to set it up.

Pros

Great thing about Travis CI is it’s easy to use, easy to configure and start running it, you can easily integrate GitHub account and whenever you push your code its integrated and tested on Travis CI. Travis CI doesn’t need hosting server to run it unlike Jenkins which require hosting server. For public projects you don’t have to pay, its free to use for you test and open source projects. Testing on different environment, devices, OS is optimized and run synchronously. You don’t have to maintain software updates for Travis CI unlike Jenkins. It is fast for testing code on different environment by having different jobs like you can have separate job for unit testing and separate jobs for integration testing.

Cons

Travis CI doesn’t have that much flexibility respect to customization as compare to Jenkins. Integration with third-party tools is not too much which reduces it flexibility. You code is accessible to Travis CI which is not good for most sensitive projects. You must pay for private projects as comparative to Jenkins which is free for private projects.

Alternatives Considered

CircleCI and Jenkins

Reasons for Choosing Travis CI

Jenkins require lot of configuration to set it up which require extra time that's why Jenkins is not good for small scale projects. We still use Jenkins for large scale project in that case Jenkins gives lot of flexibility of customization.

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

Travis require less time to configure and it doesn't require hosting server to host it. Online community support is good too.
Aldo
Overall rating
  • Industry: Education Management
  • Company size: 201-500 Employees
  • Used Daily for 1+ year
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 8.0 /10

Review for Travis

Reviewed on 19/10/2022

Pros

I like the ease to setup the CI for automating the deployments in the different applications

Cons

probably the cost if you can start to use it and don't have an idea of estimate cost

Alternatives Considered

Jenkins

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

for use the open source applications
Raphael
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: 2-10 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 1.0 /10

Used to be one of the only good option, not so much more today

Reviewed on 10/02/2021

We see it here as less and less professional. It started with a lot of time to get new images, the problem of running after 4PM (Berlin time), the cache for ccache that suddenly disappear (which makes us use even more credits, obviously), and we are missing more and more CD.

It really feels as if, after Travis was bought, that the board decided to "cash in" money. You even need to pay credits now for OSS? How is that supporting it?

Pros

I liked the ease to setup a new project with it, once you know how to get around the product.

Cons

For sure this new price plan, that was announced a day *after* it was put in place (seriously?).
It costs us more than half of the credits to make just one build. The price per minute is just insane. I can have more workers and unlimited build times with Azure DevOps, for about the same amount of money of just the subscription alone (so not counting those Travis add-ons).

When the credits are done, then the CI will just block. You need to close and reopen the PR. Problem is that we have other GitHub integrations, so this makes the process really painful.

Alternatives Considered

Jenkins and AppVeyor

Reasons for Choosing Travis CI

General maintenance time was too high for our small team.

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

We are actually also using AppVeyor. We didn't choose over Jenkins as it seemed it would still imply too much maintenance time (infrastructure and devop)
James
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: Self Employed
  • Used Monthly for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 6.0 /10

Travis CI: Great overall for over 8 years. Not anymore after travis-ci.COM migration & OSS...

Reviewed on 08/09/2021

Overall, Travis CI used to be the best turnkey solution for independent Open Source developers to set up Continuous Integration and Unit Testing pipelines. Thanks to bad actors such as unscrupulous bitcoin miners, this once great free open source community service has been morphed into a paid credit-based system. Lack of customer support responses have pushed independent volunteer open source developers out. We simply cannot afford CI testing when our software is free and open source by design.

Pros

As a long-time user of TravisCI for 8 years, I loved the ease of setting up CI testing pipelines and testing matrices with a single .travis.yml file. It made testing DevOps Chef cookbooks easy and was a great solution that integrated well with test-kitchen.

Cons

When getting a remote VM testing pipeline set up, there are some barriers to ease of debugging. This was primarily due to the lack of live SSH terminal access to poke around at the testing environment to debug job failures. After they added Debug Mode, this became a bit easier.

The main problem with Travis-CI was recently introduced with the travis-ci.COM migration. Users were encouraged to migrate projects over to the new website with no way of going back. A new paid credits system was forcibly implemented, with some promise of Open Source credits. All of my projects on TravisCI were free and OSS licensed, so I asked for OSS credits. After a few back and forth emails, I was promised 25k credits. However, after checking in the OSS credits section I still see zero credits listed.

It seems that just like that, Travis CI was taken away from OSS users who chose to migrate with no warning about the implications. Travis CI news blog posts explain that this change was made due to some nefarious bitcoin miners abusing their free build systems to mine cryptocurrency. So just like in school where the bad apple ruins it for the rest of the class, now Travis CI has been taken away from small Open Source developers.

Please improve your customer support and reinstate OSS credits for independent Open Source developers! Any kind of response or clarity around the application process would be much appreciated!

Alternatives Considered

CircleCI and Jenkins

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

I used to love the ease of setting up a Travis CI pipeline for Open Source projects. Now there are artificial barriers to doing so.
Nicholas
Overall rating
  • Industry: Education Management
  • Company size: Self Employed
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 5.0 /10

Easy-to-use product but support for OSS failing

Reviewed on 02/02/2021

Pros

I like how easy it is to deploy and get up and running with this software and configuration files, etc (e.g. it's essentially just a commandline which is nice).

It was also really nice for all of my open-source projects while travis-ci.org was still running. I could deploy and have builds run without having to worry about money.

Cons

Ever since the move to travis-ci.com, support has been terrible and I've used up all of my free trial credits on my open-source web application's Cypress integration tests (https://github.com/tutorbookapp/tutorbook).

I contacted support 5 days ago and still haven't heard back about getting more open-source credits for my account. I seriously miss travis-ci.org (though I completely understand the problems with cryptocurrency mining, etc).

Adam
Overall rating
  • Industry: Higher Education
  • Company size: 10,000+ Employees
  • Used Weekly for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 7.0 /10

Essential for software development

Reviewed on 01/02/2021

I am able to conduct a wide variety of tasks from checking compilers, running static analysis, and building documentation.

Pros

Travis-CI was the first CI system I used on my research projects, and to this day Travis-CI still does the heavy lifting on most of my tests during Continuous Integration. It's extremely flexible; I have workflows that run static analysis, security checks, documentation builds, and more. The features and integrations with a number of other systems (GitHub, CodeCov, etc.) make this my go-to CI. I especially appreciate the support for Education customers, other CIs would be quite expensive by comparison.

Cons

Operating systems support can lag. In particular, support for modern C++ compilers can be a bit tricky (it's an old item many of us have raised). The new plans price some organizations (e.g. Boost) out of using it. Support on the MacOS images is not as robust.

Alternatives Considered

GitHub, CircleCI, Microsoft Azure, GitLab and AppVeyor

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

Travis-CI provides the best pricing tier for Higher Education. I also use AppVeyor and GitHub Actions, but I've worked with Travis-CI for a number of years, so I have more functionality enabled on Travis-CI than the others.
Francis
Overall rating
  • Industry: Research
  • Company size: 51-200 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 5.0 /10

review

Reviewed on 19/02/2021

It was amazing until the recent price changes.

Pros

Very easy to setup and many integration examples.
Multiple services and environments makes it quick to setup for many testing combinations.

Cons

The pricing has gone up drastically recently and without that much time to adapt.
The best way to keep services up and running without getting caught back-and-forth requests of build minutes was to move away from the service.

Alternatives Considered

GitHub, GitLab and Bitbucket

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

Did not choose it **over** others. Each repo has its own use-case and Travis=CI is employed were applicable and still working. If Travis-CI becomes too troublesome or inconvenient, including money/support wise, our team will move toward other solutions.
Griffith
Overall rating
  • Industry: Research
  • Company size: 5,001-10,000 Employees
  • Used Monthly for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 9.0 /10

Largely self-taught, test driven developer

Reviewed on 12/03/2021

It's the core, it's the standard, and it does work fairly well. I'm kind of surprised it isn't as straightforwardly automatic to sort from GitHub, and there are some confusing elements to enabling it (and I don't quite understand why it's not more integrated with GitHub actions but maybe I'm wrong on that) but it's the standard, and automating test suits is crucial to good, maintainable code (especially if maintained by a community).

Pros

It's free if your code is open source and lots of other services (like zenodo, netlify etc.) already sort out interoperability, usually a bit sooner than gitlab.

Cons

It might be a lot quicker/better maintained for non-free use, but the options for testing packages in R, for example, are kind of weak and very slow (assuming the examples I've come across are standard). The fact that they only include python2 by default, plus some permission issues means packages using reticulate (for python/R interoperability) have a bit of a pain to get going (and it takes a long time to test). I guess if default options could be better maintained that would be much appreciated.

Alternatives Considered

GitLab

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

I didn't choose it, my employer did and to work with colleagues this was the only real option.
Verified Reviewer
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: 51-200 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 7.0 /10

Lots of features, sometimes build issues, a bit slow

Reviewed on 01/07/2021

It was a good choice at the time. But I am not sure if there are now better alternatives. I would especially check for a docker based build system.

Pros

Travis has a lot of features which can be setup easily using configuration files. It is free for open source products and not to expensive for company projects.

Cons

Quite often builds are stuck which leads to a huge stop in developments in hour company because we pretty much rely on it. Also the builds starts quite slow.

Alex
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer & Network Security
  • Company size: 10,000+ Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 10.0 /10

Travis CI: One of our sharpest, most reliable, most powerful and transformative tools.

Reviewed on 24/02/2021

It's a daily productivity driver for our team. Incredibly valuable, reliable, and one of the best tools we have in our development process.

Pros

I pushed hard for my team to build our CI/CD pipeline using Travis. It is just a tremendous tool, and I'm deeply grateful that we have this tool in our toolkit.

[SENSITIVE CONTENT HIDDEN] said "If I had eight hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend the first six of them sharpening my axe." Travis CI is one of the sharpest tools we have, and it's made a massive difference in speeding up our team's productivity. You guys recently gave us the option to upgrade our private Travis CI to include even higher numbers of parallel builds, which made a massive difference to our ability to grow our development team, and to increase the rate at which we build our own software.

Cons

For a while, we were working very hard on our end to try to figure out how to speed up our builds, and had to do quite a bit of work to try to optimize our software architecture to optimize around the limits on build concurrency in Travis. We made some progress on that, but it was slow going, and ultimately you gave us an option to pay for a higher degree of parallelism.

Julian
Overall rating
  • Industry: Renewables & Environment
  • Company size: 2-10 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 8.0 /10

Good CI

Reviewed on 28/02/2021

Travis builds, tests and deploys our software to staging and production environments. It is immensely useful, and critical to our software development pipeline.

Pros

Generally very reliable, customizable, extensible. Easy to debug. Is a workhorse.

Cons

Sometimes you'll get builds that won't debug, or builds stuck in the queue forever. This is generally because of some piece of travis infrastructure that has suddenly stopped, but there are no notifications, nor status indications that anything is wrong. Customer service can take the better part of a week to respond, or not at all.

Alternatives Considered

CircleCI

Reasons for Choosing Travis CI

Simpler, cloud hosted.

Switched From

Jenkins
EMANUELE
Overall rating
  • Industry: Information Technology & Services
  • Company size: 2-10 Employees
  • Used Daily for 1+ year
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 8.0 /10

CI / CD in a simple way

Reviewed on 02/02/2021

I'm very happy about Travis, until now I found always an answer for each need I had

Pros

1. Documentation, maybe the most important value
2. Configuration flexibility in particular GIT SSH custom keys, env variables with sensitive information, build trigger (with inline configuration... very useful for testing configurations), machine SSH encrypted keys, configuration imports, custom scripts
3. Easy integration with GitHub

Cons

Permissions check (it's not so clear understand who can build, who can view build history, who can edit configuration).

Alternatives Considered

CircleCI, Ionic and TeamCity

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

I already knew TeamCity but there wasn't a cloud version when I choosed Travis. Ionic has a ready to use mobile app configuration and we use it. I never had enough time to setup a Travis configuration build successfully a ionic app.
Denis
Overall rating
  • Industry: Design
  • Company size: 2-10 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 7.0 /10

Good product, but very expensive

Reviewed on 01/04/2021

We are using Travis CI mostly for our products that have a PHP backend and a Angular PWA application. We are prerendering all pages in our CI process which, for some reason got really slow in the last 12-24 month. I dont know if Travis CI is limiting external HTTP requests (which we rely on to get the content to render). For example a project with 500 subpages takes 30minutes to render. We already checked our Backend endpoints and these are not the limiting factor. Running is locally is has a built time for around 5-6 minutes.

Pros

I like the ease of deployments especially with multi-step-deploys of websites where the backend and frontend should be in sync.

Cons

Only thing I need to complain is the pricing. For a small design and development agency like us the price of the "concurrent job"-based plan is way too expensive while our current credit-based plan (which i'm happy that this exist) is very often exceeded due to the nature of our deployments.

Eric
Overall rating
  • Industry: Research
  • Company size: 2-10 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 9.0 /10

Hard to beat such an offer when in academia

Reviewed on 06/07/2021

The reproducibility trend is gaining momentum within the academical research community. CI usage, now a must have for software engineering concerns, can easily be stretched to address reproducibility issues and is thus being rapidly adopted.

Pros

- navigating the smooth and complete interface (with a nice github integration)
- logs are detailed, thorough and hosted for a long time
- jobs don't get to wait for long delays once triggered
- great (and generous) customer support
- nothing to install on premises

Cons

Every CI offer must face quite technical challenges to address specific/advanced services like dealing with credentials or managing sophisticated job workflows. Travis CI does the job quite nicely on such issues yet the learning curve can be quite steep at first. Yes, Travis CI does offer a thorough documentation, yet getting all the tidbits properly aligned can be a tedious task at first (your mileage may vary).

Ian
Overall rating
  • Industry: Internet
  • Company size: 2-10 Employees
  • Used Monthly for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 10.0 /10

CI tool that has a lot of value for the money

Reviewed on 27/02/2020

I started using Travis initially because I needed a way to have consistent builds of our desktop software (built on Electron). Travis has just the tools I needed to make this happen. Doing local builds of the software was processor intensive, I had to go check the status of the build and I was always changing software on my local machine so sometimes builds would fail because I changed something. Travis has completely containerized build machines so you get the same result every time. We now use it for building all our software. I don't know what we'd do without it.

Pros

* Affordable (it's priced based on users/seats)
* Documentation is solid and easy to follow. I've never needed to contact support. There's good online Q&A since Travis has a large user base.
* Versatile (whatever software you're building, there's a recipe for it)
* Github integration : you get realtime build status RIGHT in Github which is awesome, once you get your system set up, you rarely ever visit Travis again. It just works.

Cons

There's really nothing I didn't like about Travis. Some of the quirks of Electron were the trickiest things to figure out, but that's not Travis's fault. There's a little learning curve when you go from building locally to building remotely with Travis where you need to understand how to set environment variables and retrieve those values in your config/script.

Pablo
Overall rating
  • Industry: Financial Services
  • Company size: 201-500 Employees
  • Used Daily for 6-12 months
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 7.0 /10

Functional, but can be better

Reviewed on 27/04/2021

Honestly I can't say it is better than jenkins. I assume for the compay not having to deal with management and updates is an advantage, but from a user point of view is more or less the same thing. And jenkins blueocean looks way better.

Pros

It works. Does what I expected. Not a fan.

Cons

UI has lots of room for improvemente. As an example
Logs screens are annoying, because the scroll hides the header. I only want to scroll the log , not the full screen.
When I hover over a build I see a message like 'build #123 passed'. The build number does not tell me anything, it would way better to see the author and the message of the commit, it will save me a click
Everywhere you have a commit you should see a tooltip with author/message, not just the link to github

Nathan
Overall rating
  • Industry: Higher Education
  • Company size: 10,000+ Employees
  • Used Daily for 1+ year
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 0.0 /10

Poor customer support

Reviewed on 02/02/2021

It was great until the pricing model changed and customer service disappeared.

Pros

It's easy to integrate into GitHub and gives students near instant feedback about their code.

Cons

I had a problem with the non-existent customer support. On 1/16 I wrote customer support to get my class organization "blessed" as an educational account. I followed up on 1/26. With no response and credits disappearing, I'll be moving this class and future classes to GitLabs for student work.

Alternatives Considered

GitLab

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

I heard great things from coworkers.
Verified Reviewer
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: 201-500 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 9.0 /10

Nice GitHub Integration

Reviewed on 02/07/2021

Pros

I like that I can see the live status from GitHub and that the UI is very simple. I can easily find everything. The console output is colorized (it's not in other CI software I've used).

Cons

Sometimes parts of log output is collapsed, which has hidden an error for me before. It took a while, but my team figured it out.

Jiří
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: 10,000+ Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 5.0 /10

My OpenSource projects got accustomed to free CI; Travis is no longer that

Reviewed on 09/07/2021

I feel disappointed by the pricing change

Pros

Established service;
Easy to configure;
Supports macOS and AArch64 Linux

Cons

Pricing structure for free and Open Source projects

Alternatives Considered

GitHub, CircleCI, GitLab and Azure DevOps Services

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

It was one of the first services of this kind that was available. Afterwards, I never had a sufficient reason to make a switch.
Bruce
Overall rating
  • Industry: Research
  • Company size: 11-50 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 10.0 /10

Powerful, free and easy DevOps

Reviewed on 03/02/2019

Travis hasn't let me down yet. This services handles more than 90% of our builds.

Pros

Travis does a few things really well:
1. Documentation - the documentation is extensive and complete, and one never has the feeling that there are "hidden features" that only the power users know about.
2. Speed - waiting for more than a few seconds for a build to start is extremely rare.
3. Deploy integrations - builds can be deployed to a set of services easily. This is probably the easiest way to set up continuous deployment if you're on a tight budget.

Cons

The build environment can be somewhat restrictive, forcing one to choose language-specific base images and not giving access to the underlying VM.

Matthew
Overall rating
  • Industry: Internet
  • Company size: 1,001-5,000 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 2.0 /10

Static matrices and changes to OSS terms mean I cannot recommend the product

Reviewed on 28/06/2021

Our initial years with Travis were successful, and we were quite happy with the product. But over time, the lack of flexibility meant struggling to create and deploy our CI definitions.

But the part that killed Travis for us was the change to OSS terms late in 2020. We'd already noticed that our queues would become long, particularly if we had many contributors or maintainers working simultaneously. But with the changes in terms, we quickly ran into a scenario where we ran out of hours by mid-month. This left us with an untenable situation; as an OSS project, we have limited funds, and we would quickly run through those if we purchased a plan. As a result, we are within 1-2 weeks of moving off the platform entirely.

Pros

When we first started using the product, it was one of the few that existed, and it provided us exactly the assurances we needed to have predictable, stable software releases. Idempotent runs made it possible to know exactly when and why something failed.

Cons

Since we produce OSS libraries, it's important for us to test against each language version we support. Unfortunately, there is no way in Travis to dynamically create a matrix based on the library/package definition itself. For instance, we produce PHP libraries, and our package management solution, Composer, allows us to specify in the package the versions we support. Unfortunately, when we change those, we also need to remember to change the Travis definitions to reflect those changes. This becomes a source of error very quickly - Travis may report all is green, but it turns out we haven't added the new PHP version to the matrix, so it's a false sense of assurance.

On top of that, it's impossible to succinctly make discrete jobs that do different things. For instance, I don't need to run coding standards checks, static analysis, and documentation linting for every single job in the matrix; I really only need to run these once. But to do that, Travis forces me to define env variables for jobs, and then use conditionals to determine what to run. This makes the CI definitions very convoluted, and, if you have a lot of repositories that need to do the same, hard to distribute when you have changes to make.

Other CI systems address this.

Jason
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: 2-10 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Customer Support
  • Likelihood to recommend 4.0 /10

Pricing Changes, Botched Rollout

Reviewed on 01/02/2021

Overall, beyond the pricing switch, I had been very happy with Travis CI. But, after this pricing change without any notice, I have become unhappy with it. At $85/mo to build two projects without any concurrency (it's slow), I'm become less interesting in staying a customer.

Pros

I liked the ease of use getting Travis setup, the caching, and the build matrix.

Cons

I think the concurrency model is terrible. Sometimes when I want to deploy code to staging and production, I have to wait for each PR and commit to build before the push happens. Sometimes this takes 20 minutes for all branches to finish building before a push can happen. Also, I'm very unhappy with the pricing changes roll out. I have been paying for Travis for a couple years now. All of a sudden, my iOS team said they didn't think our builds were working any longer. There were a bunch of builds that didn't go through, saying we didn't have enough credits. Digging in, I realized your pricing model changed. So our builds have not been going through for close to a couple months now. I never received an email that you would be changing the pricing which would then break our builds. This to me is a botched roll out. You should have specifically told me that my iOS builds would stop working. In our dashboard, it just shows that our last build was successful 2 months ago. Not that no more builds were happening. This is unacceptable. So much so, that I am actually now reading the Travis CI to Circle CI migration document. Circle CI seems like a cheaper option for us now.

Alternatives Considered

CircleCI

Reasons for Choosing Travis CI

Circle CI seemed to be more friendly to my Ruby on Rails projects. When I switched to a Python project, it seemed like more of the open source python tools that I saw were using Travis CI. So I switched to Travis for this new project.

Switched From

CircleCI

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

I believe I will be switch back. Travis seems like the expensive option now.
Thomas
Overall rating
  • Industry: Food & Beverages
  • Company size: Self Employed
  • Used Daily for 1-5 months
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Value for Money
  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 3.0 /10

Great product - Pricing is insane for someone on a single team

Reviewed on 02/02/2021

Good experience - got hooked on the free trial, but it's time to move on as its costing an arm & a leg.

Pros

I really like Travis CI, creating .travis.yml files is easy enough & I love the interface for seeing my build progress. That said I'll be moving off of this platform very shortly.

Cons

The cost is insane - Azure DevOps offers pipelines for free, my AWS sites (5 of them) cost less to host than my Travis CI subscription, AWS has a DevOps implementation that is about $15/mo - even if Travis CI was at $20-$25/mo I would consider it as a solution.

Alternatives Considered

AWS Config and Azure DevOps Server

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

I was working through a tutorial on AWS & this was offered as the CI / CD solution, since the trial was free I opted for it. Now that my project is in production though this pricing is my highest cost service & needs to be addressed.
Patryk
Overall rating
  • Industry: Computer Software
  • Company size: 51-200 Employees
  • Used Daily for 2+ years
  • Review Source

Overall rating

  • Ease of Use
  • Likelihood to recommend 10.0 /10

Recommendation

Reviewed on 01/02/2021

Pros

It's easy to use and configure and also a nice user experience.

Cons

It's expensive in comparison to other solutions